Paradise Country Progress Pics

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A work that has been picked up again and again over the past few weeks and finally finished today! I always start with a rough picture in mind, but I never sketch it out. The foreground and focal points are the first to be paint-sketched in.

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Next comes the broad strokes and general shapes of the middle ground. I gradually build on these, adding more and more detail. I always take a step back and look at the painting after each layer I do.

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More detail and more interesting shapes are added. I wanted to add one deciduous tree for a load of OCD-like detail, just because it’s like therapy for me–when I can get lost for a few hours. I was going to put in a windmill to the right of the house, but the tree overtook the space a bit.

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Next I add the tree-topped mountains in the back, along with the night sky. The darker value of the sky really sets of the shapes set against it.

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And…finish up with the details of the details: chicken feather colors and patterns, greenish-gray rock foreground and middle ground, ground cover next to the house, and all the little details of the house itself (which I LOVE). AND I add the stars: first I just dot the already-colored sky with plain water, let it dry and bleed to make a very shimmery, translucent area. Then, I dot some of those spots with white acrylic, to really make a glowing effect.

I’ve really been rediscovering the differences between liquid watercolors, like Dr. Ph Martin’s, and tube watercolors, like Grumbacher or Daniel Smith or Da Vinci. Also, the quality of watercolor PAPER really makes a difference too!

Evergreen Tutorial

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Hello, all. I’m presenting my step-by-step painting process of the 5″ x 7″ watercolor Evergreen.

1. I always start out with an image in mind. Most of the time, I don’t like to draw it out before I start painting. I like spontaneous things to happen, for different ideas to occur as the painting emerges. So, the only thing I draw in the beginning is the focal point object/subject. For this one, I looked at a bunch of pictures of little woodland cottages for inspiration.

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2. Next, lay down a wash surrounding the focal point–in this case, the little cottage. I usually do this by selecting an undiluted color of medium strength and then apply it around the lines of the drawing with a fairly small round brush, like a #2. I then blend outward with water using progressively bigger round and filbert brushes, covering the entire sheet (it’s a good idea to have two glasses of water when working: one for cleaning, the other filled with nice, clear water for blending). To the clear wash covering the sheet, I begin dabbing color in in large swathes with a big filbert brush. I also add color straight from the dabber when using Dr. Ph Martin liquid watercolors (calypso green, here).

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3. The next step involves picking out shapes around the focal point drawing. When fashioning the shapes, keep in mind placement and orientation, hard vs. soft edges, symmetry and asymmetry, etc. With my paintings, I want the individual shapes to work together and harmonize visually. For this particular piece, I used my hiking excursions in redwood forests as inspiration for the shapes. In general, the shapes in this piece are predominantly geometrical and hard-edged (as opposed to rounded and more organic), with the exception of the wild ginger groundcover that is added later.

 

4. Keep layering in complementary shapes. I use small round brushes for the initial outlines of the shapes and then blend with either a flat or filbert brush. A note on color: I wanted this piece to be a bit muted in color, so I added most of the greens and golds within the first few layers. The greens and the golds in these layers are unmixed, though pretty dilute.

5. In the ensuing layers, I added a lot of Payne’s Gray to the greens and sometimes used just Payne’s Gray in order to tone down the color. Remember to blend outward with every layer using the clean water. Blend to the edge of the paper; the edge of where the water ends always dries visibly (sometimes, this proves to be an interesting effect, sometimes not so much).

6. Usually, when I feel I’m done layering in shapes, I offset the last ones with a dark wash of color. I like to save a significant space for this; here in this painting, it will be the night sky. This gives a good amount of contrast to the upper part of the painting.

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7. The bottom foreground portion of this painting require some thinking. I didn’t want to add more similar shapes to the background conifer shapes–no ferns or the like, something different, yet consistent. I decided on the heart-shaped leaves of the wild ginger that can frequently be found in the redwood forests. I basically picked out a few shapes in the immediate foreground, like I did with the conifer shapes behind the cottage, and kept adding layers. I also snuck in a Stellar’s Jay in the bottom left corner for added interest.

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8. Lastly, I finished filling out the bird with blues and blacks and filled in the stars using white acrylic. The house was painted using the negative technique, with the lines in white, using only a single layer of paint. Blue, green, and yellow are next to one another successively in the color wheel, and this gives an overall calming effect to the piece.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask!!